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Thursday, April 25, 2024

Every Home Tricolour Campaign And Value Of Flag Code

Our national flag i.e. tricolour. Seeing him waving, his chest expands with pride. In his honour, I want to salute him. No one should misuse our national symbols, no one should insult them. Don’t throw the flags; don’t even put them in the dustbin. Keep the flags kept at home by folding them. Under the ‘Har Ghar Tiranga’ campaign, people have put up flags at their homes. In such a situation, people can clean and press these tricolours with respect and keep them safely inside the house. These flags can be used for the next year. In the enthusiasm of celebrating ‘Amrit Mahotsav of Independence’, do not lose consciousness that the national flag has a respect of its own. Insulting it in any form can take a toll on your freedom.

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By: Priyanka Saurabh

As part of the celebration of India’s 76th year of independence, the Government of India has launched the “Har Ghar Tiranga” campaign. It is important to understand the Flag Code of India while participating in the campaign. ‘Har Ghar Tiranga’ is a campaign under the aegis of Azadi Ka Amrit Mahotsav, which aims to encourage people to bring home the tricolour and hoist it to mark India’s 76th year of independence. Through this campaign, citizens have been encouraged to hoist the flag at their homes from 13 to 15 August 2023. The idea behind this initiative is to inculcate the spirit of patriotism in the hearts of people and to promote awareness about the Indian National Flag. The Indian National Flag represents the hopes and aspirations of the people of India. It is a symbol of our national pride and there is universal affection, respect, and allegiance to the national flag. It holds a unique and special place in the sentiments and psyche of the people of India. The hoisting/use/display of the Indian National Flag is governed by the Prevention of Insults to National Honor Act, 1971, and the Flag Code of India, 2002. The Flag Code of India brings together all the laws, conventions, practices, and instructions for the display of the national flag. It regulates the display of the national flag by private, public, and government institutions. Our national flag i.e. tricolour. Seeing him waving, his chest expands with pride. In his honour, I want to salute him.

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First of all, on 7 August 1906, the first national flag was hoisted at Parsi Bagan Square near ‘Lower Circular Road’ in Calcutta (now Kolkata). At that time it had three horizontal stripes of red, yellow, and green. After this, after going through many changes, this national flag was accepted in its present form by the Constituent Assembly on 22 July 1947. Freedom fighter Pingali Venkayya had an important contribution in designing its present form. The current national flag has dark saffron at the top, white in the middle, and dark green at the bottom in equal proportions. The ratio of width and length of the flag is 2:3. In the center of the white band is a dark blue wheel, the pattern of which is similar to that seen in the wheel on the capital of Ashoka’s lion capital at Sarnath. The circumference of the circle is approximately equal to the width of the white stripe. There are 24 spokes in the wheel. No one should misuse our national symbols, no one should insult them. Keeping this in mind, the Emblems and Names (Prevention of Improper Use) Act, of 1950 was brought in the year 1950. It prohibits the use of the national flag, emblems used by government departments, the official seal of the President or Governor, pictorial representations of Mahatma Gandhi and the Prime Minister, and the Ashoka Chakra. After this, the Prevention of Insults to National Honor Act, 1971 was brought. It prohibits the disrespect of all national symbols of the country, including the national flag, the constitution, the national anthem, and the Indian map.

Whenever the flag is hoisted, it should be given a respectable place. It should be installed in such a place where it is visible. The flag is flown on government buildings from sunrise to sunset even on Sundays and other holidays, and on special occasions, it may be flown at night. That is, usually the hoisting of the flag is not allowed after sunset. The flag should always be hoisted with enthusiasm and lowered slowly with respect. If the bugle is played while hoisting and lowering it, it should be kept in mind that the flag should be hoisted and lowered with the sound of the bugle. If the flag is displayed on the dais, it shall be flown in such a way that when the speaker is facing the audience, the flag is on his right. If the flag is to be displayed on the car of an officer, then it should be displayed in the front center or on the right side of the car. Nothing should be written or printed on the flag and a torn or soiled flag is not flown. If the flag is torn or soiled, it should be destroyed in private in a dignified manner. The flag is flown at half-mast only on the occasion of national mourning. No other flag or ensign shall be hoisted higher or higher than the national flag, nor shall it be kept at par. The tricolour cannot be used for commercial purposes. Apart from this, the flag should not be used as a celebration or for any kind of decoration.

The Flag Code of India came into force on 26 January 2002. The Flag Code of India, 2002 was amended by an order dated December 30, 2021. Now, the National Flag shall be made of hand-spun and hand-woven or machine-made, cotton/ polyester/ woollen/silk khadi. A member of the public, a private organization, or an educational institution may hoist/display the National Flag on all days and occasions, ceremonially or otherwise, in a manner consistent with the dignity and respect of the National Flag. The Flag Code of India, 2002 was amended by an order dated 19th July 2022. Now, when the flag is displayed in the open or at the home of a member of the public, it may be flown day and night. The shape of the National Flag shall be rectangular. The flag can be of any size but the ratio of length and height (width) of the flag will be 3:2.

Earlier the flag was allowed to be hoisted in the open only from sunrise to sunset. Now any Indian citizen, private or educational institution can unfurl the tricolour day and night on all days and occasions with the pride and honour of the national flag. Now, apart from hand-woven, hand-stitched, and machine-made flags of cotton, wool, silk, and khadi, the use of polyester-made or stitched flags has also been permitted. For the burial of damaged flags, all damaged flags are folded and placed in a wooden box. Then it is buried in the ground in a safe place. There should be a peaceful environment while doing this. Choose a safe place to burn the flag, fold the flag properly and carefully place it on the fire. Don’t throw the flags; don’t even put them in the dustbin. Keep the flags kept at home by folding them. Under the ‘Har Ghar Tiranga’ campaign, people have put up flags at their homes. In such a situation, people can clean and press these tricolours with respect and keep them safely inside the house. These flags can be used for the next year. (The author is a Research Scholar in Political Science, poetess, independent journalist and a columnist)

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The Hills Times
The Hills Timeshttps://www.thehillstimes.in/
The Hills Times, a largely circulated English daily published from Diphu and printed in Guwahati, having vast readership in hills districts of Assam, and neighbouring Nagaland, Meghalaya, Arunachal Pradesh and Manipur.
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