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Friday, March 1, 2024

Red Sea crisis

The Red Sea crisis, also known as the United States-Iran proxy war, has emerged as a significant bottleneck affecting India’s maritime trade, particularly its exports of marine products and high-quality rice to key markets like the United States, Middle East, and Europe. Originating from Yemen’s Houthi attacks targeting southern Israel and ships in the Red Sea, this conflict has compelled ships to avoid the traditional Suez Canal route, opting instead for the longer journey around the Cape of Good Hope. As a result, Indian shipments face delays of up to a month, with approximately 25% of outbound shipments being held back

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The Red Sea crisis, also known as the United States-Iran proxy war, has emerged as a significant bottleneck affecting India’s maritime trade, particularly its exports of marine products and high-quality rice to key markets like the United States, Middle East, and Europe. Originating from Yemen’s Houthi attacks targeting southern Israel and ships in the Red Sea, this conflict has compelled ships to avoid the traditional Suez Canal route, opting instead for the longer journey around the Cape of Good Hope. As a result, Indian shipments face delays of up to a month, with approximately 25% of outbound shipments being held back. India’s heavy dependence on the Red Sea route for trade with regions like the Middle East, Europe, North America, and North Africa is evident. These regions collectively contribute to about 50% of India’s exports and 30% of its imports. However, with ships now diverting to the longer Africa route due to safety concerns, trade has been severely impacted. The repercussions extend to India’s status as the world’s largest rice exporter, responsible for 40% of global rice shipments. While a ban on white rice and broken varieties imposed in July 2023 affected 30% of India’s shipments, recent escalations in the Red Sea have exacerbated challenges, particularly for basmati rice exports. The increased cost of transportation amidst the Israel-Gaza conflict and attacks on commercial ships by Houthi militants have driven up freight rates, resulting in a significant drop in exports compared to the previous year.

Traders are grappling with skyrocketing freight costs, container shortages, and longer transit times, leading to disputes over contracts and cancellations of orders. Consequently, prices for Indian basmati rice have fluctuated, with the market experiencing an 8% decline due to stockpiling and limited availability. The situation is compounded by the state-run Food Corporation of India’s increased purchases from rice farmers, depleting stocks for private traders. While tensions in the Middle East persist, there is no immediate resolution in sight for the Red Sea crisis. The ongoing conflict between Houthi forces and their attacks on global shipping routes continues to disrupt trade, prompting a cautious approach from exporters. Moreover, with India’s upcoming Lok Sabha elections and the impending monsoon season affecting agricultural production, the outlook for rice exports remains uncertain. In light of these challenges, the World Bank suggests that India easing its export restrictions could help stabilize rice prices amidst global uncertainties. However, industry executives anticipate that any policy changes will likely be postponed until after the elections. Despite logistical hurdles and geopolitical tensions, OPEC producers’ gradual reduction in output has helped maintain stable oil prices, offering some respite amid the crisis.

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As India navigates the complexities of global trade disruptions, its role as a key rice supplier is under scrutiny, highlighting the interconnectedness of regional conflicts and international commerce. Amidst the challenges posed by the Red Sea crisis, India faces a delicate balancing act between domestic priorities and international obligations. With the spectre of food inflation looming and the need to ensure food security for its citizens, policymakers must navigate a complex landscape of trade-offs and strategic decisions. Furthermore, the Red Sea crisis underscores the urgent need for diplomatic intervention to de-escalate tensions and restore stability to crucial maritime trade routes, safeguarding global economic interests and regional stability.

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The Hills Times
The Hills Timeshttps://www.thehillstimes.in/
The Hills Times, a largely circulated English daily published from Diphu and printed in Guwahati, having vast readership in hills districts of Assam, and neighbouring Nagaland, Meghalaya, Arunachal Pradesh and Manipur.
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